Belfort is in the top 200 games on BGG!

belfort_logoYou read that right – Belfort has made its way into the top 200 games on boardgamegeek.com! This rating is based on users rating games on a scale of 1 to 10 and then they do some funky math to ensure brand new games with five ratings of 10 isn’t the number 1 game of all time!

So huzzah and a big thank you to everyone who’s played it and rated it on BGG. It’s amazing to have designed a game that now sits amongst my own favourite games of all time!

belfort-200

-Jay Cormier

 

Belfort’s in the Top 250 Games!

Today Belfort squeaked its way into the top 250 games of all time, according to boardgamegeek.com users. Users on this site (which can be anyone), rate the games and this allows the site to then compare and rank all of the games together. For those who need some context – the list is compiled of over 60,000 games!

To make it a bit more fair, such that a new game with only 8 votes of 10 out of 10 doesn’t immediately grab the top spot on this list, bgg.com adds an unknown number of votes of 5.5 to each game. This means that each game needs a lot of votes to bring its average up. Because of this, all games start way down the list, and as they get more and more votes (assuming the votes are above 5.5!), then the game climbs the list!

It’s exciting to be recognized as a top 250 game by gamers! Thanks everyone who voted for the game!

-Jay Cormier

Most Anticipated Games – Results…and another 2 reviews!

The Most Anticipated Games of 2012 poll on boardgamegeek is now over and the results are in! I’m happy to report that the currently unnamed Belfort expansion made the list…twice!

It’s the 10th most anticipated expansion that’s due out this year. That’s pretty stellar as we’re in ridiculously fantastic company with the rest of the list comprised of expansions to these games:

1. 7 Wonders
2. Race for the Galaxy
3. Alien Frontiers
4. Quarriors!
5. Dominion
6. Galaxy Trucker
7. Cosmic Encounter
8. Eminent Domain
9. Summoner Wars
10. Belfort

Wow! Those are all huge games and we’re stoked to be included in this list! See full list here. But it doesn’t stop there. We were also the 9th most anticipated Economic game. Economic games are Euro-styled games that involve producing and managing resources and income of some sort – which is definitely what Belfort is all about. Here are the results for this category:

1. Merchants of Venus (Stronghold edition)
2. Merchants of Venus (Fantasy Flight edition)
3. Alien Frontiers: Factions
4. Agricola: Cave Farmers
5. Goa
6. Vinhos
7. Kings of Air and Steam
8. Crude: The Oil Game
9. Belfort expansion!
10.  CO2

Again, what a list of amazing titles (if I do say so myself!). Very cool and very exciting. See full list here. Thanks to all those who voted!

Here’s another review of Belfort. This time by Opinionated Gamers. The main review was written by Matt Carlson and he seemed to really like it. I really liked this statement he made:

I’ve got quite a few plays under my belt now, and I still haven’t tired of Belfort.

As that shows that there is re-playability to the game! It’s also worth noting that Belfort isn’t a game for everyone, as not all of the Opinionated Gamers liked it. One of the reasons why I like Opinionated Gamers so much is that they don’t just give you one opinion – they give you many!  So 4 of them liked it, 1 was neutral to it and 3 said it wasn’t for them – which is fair. Check out their review here. Thanks for playing it…and for you opinions!

The next ‘review’ is more of a summary and thoughts on their most recent play of the game. Geek Insight, over at Giant Fire Breathing Robot continues to like the game, even though he got smacked around by some Interactive Guilds this time! He points out a few new learnings about the advantages and disadvantages of going last on the final turn! Thanks for playing!

-Jay Cormier

Step 10: Pretty up your Prototype: Stage 2 – Tools and Supplies part 2

Continuing the list of tools and supplies you’ll need to make a good looking prototype!

Cubes: If you go to a school supply store you should be able to buy a tub of 1cm multi-coloured plastic cubes.  This will cost you around $25-$30 and will be your supply of pieces for over a dozen games.  These cubes can be used as character markers, resources or money.  I also found some 2 cm wooden cubes that came in many colours at a dollar store.  Having cubes in two different sizes has helped in numerous games!

Poker Chips: Poker chips (the cheaper small ones) make for great money in a game, and they usually come in different colours too.  You could use cubes if you don’t need cubes for other things, but if we are using cubes to indicate player markers, then it would be confusing to players if cubes were also used for money – even if they were different colours.

Pawns: Pawns seem to be the hardest thing to come by.  Sure there are plenty of places online to buy them, and I really should dive in and buy a bunch in different colours, but they’re hard to find in stores.  It should be pretty obvious that pawns are needed in a lot of games.  Again you could use cubes (and sometimes we do), but if cubes are already representing something else, then pawns are needed.

Stones: Not mandatory at all, but we have found that using these pretty gem stones add some class to a prototype.  Usually we end up just using cubes, but for Rune Masters the stones seemed to make more sense for one component that we called Rune Stones (why would we use cubes for that!?).

Misc pieces: For our 5th or 6th prototype for Santorini we changed how resources were being shipped and resources had to be placed directly onto ships instead of ‘jumping’ from one island to another.  Up until then our ships were just pawns, so we had to make some ships which we did out of gluing some popsicle sticks together.  It was serendipitous that popsicle sticks are also 1cm wide as that allowed us to even create side ridges on our ships so that the 1cm resource cubes could snugly fit in the ships – very cool!

Tools we bought that we thought we needed but we don’t really:

Corner Rounder: We had a couple games where we thought the professional looking rounded edges of some of the components would take it over the top.  It did make some of the prototypes look pretty sweet, but we just didn’t end up using it that much to make it worthwhile.

Die Cutter: We had one game that we needed to make a bunch of similarly shaped tags out of plastic and cutting them by hand seemed ridiculous, so we got a die cutter.  Yeah, not so great a purchase!  It was fine for that one game, but we never used it again.

Once the game is nearing its final stages of life and is ready to be shown to a publisher, then it’s time to make an amazing prototype!  For now it’s important to understand that you will probably still make 5-20 more prototypes of each game before sending it to a Publisher, so no need to spend too much time.

So how far is too far?  Well, I met one game designer who had a party game designed.  The prototyped looked amazing as each of the cards had a printed front and back to them – and they were all professionally laminated.  I was impressed for sure.  We played the game and gave our feedback and the next time I saw him he had his game again – but this time with a whole new prototype.  All the cards were brand new – but they looked as professional as they did before.  I saw him two more times and both times he had another brand new professionally made prototype.  He must have spent a lot of money getting these prototypes made.  I asked him why he spends so much money on getting them made and his answer was that he always thought that the next prototype was going to be the last prototype.  While we all hope that will be the case for each of us, experience tells me (and hopefully that guy by now!) that there is almost always going to be one more prototype to be made!

For our first game we ever made, Top Shelf, Sen and I spent a lot of time making an amazing looking prototype!  We made the board and affixed it to cardboard so that it folded like a real board!  Then we affixed each tile to matte board and even affixed a backing to each tile so that it had the logo for the game on the back!  Then we even ‘sanded’ down the edges of the tiles so they … hmmm…not sure why we did that!  They looked cooler though!  It was too much of course and when we had to make our next prototype of that game it was much simpler.

-Jay Cormier

(and yes, I realize how silly the title of this blog post is: Step 10, Stage 2, Part 2…!)

If anyone has links to share of part/bit suppliers, please share! I’ll look through mine and post later.

But, to respond/add to this post, here are my additions to the list:

STORAGE

I would say another essential bit of gear is a good “bit box” – something to store all your cubes, dice, etc. in an organized, sorted fashion. Jay and I both use things that were probably intended for hardware (nails and screws, etc.) Mine has a handle and 4 trays that pull out, each with customizable sections. I use them to put everything in one neat cube of game design bits.

COLOURING/DRAWING TOOLS

We use Sharpies a lot. Also wood stain markers, acrylic paints, spray primer, pencil crayons, etc. Other “must have” drawing tools include a good metal rule, erasers, pencil sharpeners. Some tools we have used on the rare occasion include number and letter stencils or stamps for use on plastic or wooden bits that we can’t print on. Not everything can be loaded in Tray 1 of the laser printer!

ADHESIVES

Stick glue and spray adhesives are used a lot to make the final prototype. I use that bluetack stuff to cobble pieces together from time to time, to hold tiles to map boards more permanently, etc.

DICE

Self-explanatory – we have a plethora of polyhedra dice at our disposal. Like any good game geeks should. Jay and I don’t use a ton of dice, by nature (Jay has diceaphobia, or maybe he’s a dicist, I’m not sure), but it helps to have some methods of randomly generating numbers around!

BAGS

Helpful for storage as well as randomizing tiles or cubes and keeping them hidden from view. Great for games like “Santorini” to keep resource cubes random or for “Scene of the Crime” to keep the clue tiles hidden from view.

OTHER CUTTING TOOLS

I have a Dremel that I use to cut, grind, and rout wood blocks, mostly – I also have a coping saw for cutting small metal rods/tubes or harder woods and plastics. Both were invaluable for creating “Junkyard”.

OTHER STUFF

Some components are very dependent on the game you’re making – like magnets, push pin flags, etc, – but, like Jay said, we will often find stuff that we think is cool and just grab them in the event that they might come in handy someday! If they come in many different colours (at least the game standards like red/blue/green/yellow), it’s a pretty sure bet, I’ll purchase enough to make a set of 10 of each.

OTHER TOOLS WE HAVE BUT RARELY USE

The only other one that comes to mind is my sticker maker.

ONE MORE THING

re: How many prototypes to make…while you will be making maaaaany versions to get to your final, sometimes, you will need to make a few of the final versions, especially if you have an agent who may wish to show your game to a prospective publisher and leave a prototype with them while the agent sets up the next meeting with another publisher. Note that some agents may not show a game to a second publisheruntil the first publisher has exercised their “right of first refusal”, but it’s always good to have an extra prototype versus having to scramble to make a whole other copy at the last minute. Not that we’ve ever had to do that ourselves…

-Sen-Foong Lim